Here is the World.

"Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don't be afraid."
— Frederick Buechner

Hi! I'm a writer and this is my tumblr. I post lots of things about representation and diversity and writing and art. There are also cute animals, nerdly things and dragons on occasion.

I am just learning about trigger warnings and tagging, so please be careful, especially when browsing the terrible tag. I’m going to try and do better about that going forward, but I post anything that needs more/better tags, please let me know. I want this to be a safe space. :)

There will occasionally be personal things, like links to my blog or book news, but mostly it’s just me reblogging other people’s smart thoughts and giggling at hobbit gifs.
Recent Tweets @
Who I Follow
White Americans always think racism is a feeling, and they reject it or they embrace it. To most [white] Americans, it seems more honorable and nicer to reject it, so they do, but they almost invariably fail to understand that how they feel means very little to black Americans, who understand racism as a way of structuring American culture, American politics, and the American economy.

Jane Smiley, Say it Ain’t So, Huck: Second thoughts on Mark Twain’s “Masterpiece” (Harper’s Magazine, 1996)

This is perfect.

(via tiiigerstyle)

(via elloellenoh)

joybeanie:

When a writer kills off a character

image

When you kill off your own characterimage

(via bethanyhagen)

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

(via malindalo)

copperbadge:

thexturtle:

oliviawhen:

A truly unstoppable force.

Paging copperbadge.

They steal great works of arf

And sell them on the wag market.

It was only okay.
The very worst thing you can ever say to an artist of any kind
everything-is-stickers:

fezwhatfez:

thequietpagan:

bywandandsword:

Fucking shit

This is simultaneously cool-looking and absolutely terrifying.

i was like, ohhhh what adorable little - AHHHHHH NO

OOOH NO

everything-is-stickers:

fezwhatfez:

thequietpagan:

bywandandsword:

Fucking shit

This is simultaneously cool-looking and absolutely terrifying.

i was like, ohhhh what adorable little - AHHHHHH NO

OOOH NO

(via missterlovett)

So my hard-boiled egg rolled off the table this morning…

But the best possible thing you can do is get your ass down onto the floor. Write so blazingly good that you can’t be framed. Nobody is going to give you permission to write about your vagina, hon. Nobody is going to give you a thing. You have to give it yourself. You have to tell us what you have to say.

That’s what women writers throughout time have done and it’s what we’ll continue to do. It’s not true that to be “a woman writer means to suffer mercilessly and eventually collapse in a heap of ‘I could have been better than this,’” nor is it true that a “unifying theme is many of their careers ended in suicide” and I strongly encourage you to let go of these beliefs. They are inaccurate and melodramatic and they do not serve you. People of all professions suffer and kill themselves. In spite of various mythologies regarding artists and how psychologically fragile we are, the fact is that occupation is not a top predictor for suicide. Yes, we can rattle off a list of women writers who’ve killed themselves and yes, we may conjecture that their status as women in the societies in which they lived contributed to the depressive and desperate state that caused them to do so. But it isn’t the unifying theme.

You know what is?

How many women wrote beautiful novels and stories and poems and essays and plays and scripts and songs in spite of all the crap they endured. How many of them didn’t collapse in a heap of “I could have been better than this” and instead went right ahead and became better than anyone would have predicted or allowed them to be. The unifying theme is resilience and faith. The unifying theme is being a warrior and a motherfucker. It is not fragility. It’s strength. It’s nerve. And “if your Nerve, deny you –,” as Emily Dickinson wrote, “go above your Nerve.” Writing is hard for every last one of us—straight white men included. Coal mining is harder. Do you think miners stand around all day talking about how hard it is to mine for coal? They do not. They simply dig.

You need to do the same, dear sweet arrogant beautiful crazy talented tortured rising star glowbug. That you’re so bound up about writing tells me that writing is what you’re here to do. And when people are here to do that they almost always tell us something we need to hear. I want to know what you have inside you. I want to see the contours of your second beating heart.

Read this Dear Sugar column for the first time last night. Might have burrowed under covers to have a little cry afterwards. (via dynamofire)

THIS!

(via lauriehalseanderson)

(via lauriehalseanderson)

metaneira:

A few months ago I was playing World of Warcraft — as is my wont — and was mindlessly listing gemstones in the auction house. Though I usually try to ignore the in-game chat channels, I couldn’t help but notice one shaman asking for help with his gear. Now, if you’ve ever been on the internet before, you may know that asking even reasonable questions to a group of anonymous people will likely result in some or all of the following: insults, incorrect answers, deliberately false answers, and more insults. The shaman was asking what sort of gear he needed to play his character with a particular specialization (shaman can be either healers or they can deal damage via melee attacks or spellcasting). His questions weren’t being answered and people were mocking his spelling. The shaman apologized, saying he was a 79 year old man and didn’t type very well. The people in the chat channel then mocked him for this.

I looked up the shaman’s gear and found he was wearing a hodgepodge of items that weren’t itemized very well for his intended role (a melee damage-dealer). I bought him several pieces of gear off the auction house and mailed it to his character along with a note with a few tips. I also told him if he ever had any questions, he could ask me at any time.

I got an in-game mail back from him later that day. He said that it’s hard for him to play this game since the younger players don’t have patience for him. He never learned to type in school and his reflexes were slower. “I went through Korea and Vietnam and they were good enough then to keep me alive,” he wrote. He thanked me for helping him and for changing his mind about his fellow players.

Now, whenever I get frustrated with a player who isn’t playing well, I just imagine that the character is being played by my own Korean war veteran grandfather, who will be 83 this summer. I keep checking back on my little shaman friend. He only has two more levels before he hits the level-cap. I think I’ll buy him a present for when he does.

(via cleolinda)

Think about it this way:

There’s a group of us. We’re either whispering quietly because we don’t want to upset anyone, or we’re just out of your sight so you can’t really hear us. And then, all of a sudden, somehow you hear us or someone leaves the group and tells you or someone voices their frustrations to you. And instead of listening, or providing them a space to boost that voice so people in other rooms will hear them, you walk back to their private room and start shouting. And people in other rooms hear you and they say ‘wow this is so great I’ve never thought of this before’ and they keep passing it on.

But we’ve been having this conversation the entire time.

I’m Still Here" by Sumayyah Daud (via yahighway)

If you’re interested in promoting diversity in publishing, (or anywhere else really) you need to go read this entire article ASAP.

(via elloellenoh)

lifeonthemidlist:

Request new books at your library!!!
Buy new books!
Buy old books!
And leave some sweet reviews for your faves!

Certain words perpetually rot inside of me and refuse to come out.
Virginia Woolf, from Selected Diaries (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via mindyraf)

historicaltimes:

1940. U.K. A boy sits amid the ruins of a London bookshop following an air raid on October 8, 1940, reading a book titled “The History of London.”

(via miriamjoyblogs)

powells:

Happy Earth Day! Make your profile picture one of our magical Earth Day 2014 patches and spread the love of used books far and wide! http://powells.us/1raK4Yr