Here is the World.

"Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don't be afraid."
— Frederick Buechner

Hi! I'm a writer and this is my tumblr. I post lots of things about representation and diversity and writing and art. There are also cute animals, nerdly things and dragons on occasion.

I am just learning about trigger warnings and tagging, so please be careful, especially when browsing the terrible tag. I’m going to try and do better about that going forward, but I post anything that needs more/better tags, please let me know. I want this to be a safe space. :)

There will occasionally be personal things, like links to my blog or book news, but mostly it’s just me reblogging other people’s smart thoughts and giggling at hobbit gifs.
Recent Tweets @MiriamForster
Who I Follow

undeadseanbean:

nonhoration:

earthlydreams:

This is so cool! But what country are they from? “Africa” is really vague.

Their names are Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, Faleke Oluwatoyin, and Bello Eniola and they’re from Lagos, Nigeria. There’s a neat video about them here.

(via megancrewe)

trumpetangst:

these are GORGEOUS omg

(via abstractandbriefchronicles)

kiransingh:

the only domestic instinct my parents have managed to pass on to me is the tendency to hoard multiple plastic bags in another plastic bag despite the fact that I will probably never need this many plastic bags in my adult life

(via missterlovett)

chasingtrophywhitetails:

Does anyone else reply to a text mentally but not physically then forgets to actually reply all together or is that just me

Texts, Facebook messages, Tumblr questions, emails….

All. The. Time.

(via booksandglobes)

deskgirl:

nonbinaryviola:

talk street magic to me

drawing power from the metro lines

illusionists busking illegally, shimmering lights disintegrating as they run

plant mages tending tiny rooftop and windowbox gardens

elementary school kids learning basic sigils on the playground

wixen taking a while to key into the magic in new cities when they move

alchemists dealing on the side to support their experiments

middle schoolers making friendship talismans and amulets for everyone

numerologists who’ll do your math homework for $5 or divine your fortune for $10

kids mass-texting luck and speed spells when their parties get broken up by the cops

Hell yeah, let’s talk about magic.

Like elementary kids learning silly (or inappropriate) charms from each other on the bus, the same way we learned our first swear words. Clapping games across the bus aisle, but with spells instead of rhymes.

Worrying that your friend is getting into dark magic, but not knowing how to talk to them about it. Intervention programs for kids abusing hexes and runes, because magic has given them control over something for once in their life, and they’re starting to make some dangerous choices.

Psychic teachers knowing when you’re cheating. Knowing when you’re having trouble with homework. Or at home. Knowing when you need tutoring or an AP course because you’re just not being challenged or a different teaching method because you can’t process what you’re learning in class no matter how hard you try, and the teacher tells you it’s okay, they know. They know.

Magic graffiti. Graffiti in wild places, and graffiti that vanishes when certain people roll by like the police. Or graffiti that only appears when the police walk by to insult them. Murals. Swirling, living murals on the sides of buildings. Murals that—if you listen closely—can be heard, not just seen.

In the evenings, kids hiding out in someone’s backyard or an alley passing around a joint and casting minor illusions to watch while high.

Chalk artists making works that are so realistic, they come to life off of the sidewalk.

One man bands in the park, with instruments floating around playing themselves.

Punk concerts in empty lots with amped out music and lights, but noise-cancelling spells and illusion hide them in plain sight from anyone outside of the lot.

Mediums predicting people in need, and making sure to be there at just the right moment to lend them a helping hand. “You seem upset, do you need to talk?” “Oh, you’re a dollar short? No, don’t put the milk back; I’ll cover you.” “You really ought to try taking your resume to this store. Trust me.”

Necromancers in forensics speaking with the dead to solve homicides and cold cases. Living lie detectors as beat cops and detectives and DEA agents.

Strangely cheap five star food diners that bake actual love into their apple pie, and they always know your dietary restrictions without being told.

Service golems in various sizes and shapes, making sure their magic users aren’t crowded, get medical attention, go where they need to, etc. They don’t get distracted, they can be hollow to hold things like medications, and in rare instances, they seem to develop loving attachment to their users despite not being alive.

Little old landladies who dabble in witchcraft brewing homeopathic remedies for people in their apartment complex.

Street magic is an amazing concept.

(via abstractandbriefchronicles)

sheisstrangerthanfiction:

"You will fucking do your arts.  I will sit on you and stare at you, and you will do your arts." — Responsibility Owl.  

(via elsiechapmanauthor)

ivylaughed:

mageflower:

image

i also have curly hair and you’re actually not supposed to brush it when it’s dry!! it’ll frizz and break the curls. combing it with a wide tooth comb in the shower is the way to go

I generally…

I have white girl curly hair too. If it gets messed up, wet it. Take a mini shower with no products or just use the sink to get it damp and malleable again.

White girl curls here too! And water will definitely work. Even just a hot steamy shower without wetting your hair will get it to calm down. Or pin the curls back down, wet the roots with your fingers and leave the pins in for twenty minutes.

Though honestly, I just usually throw on a headband or tie a handkerchief around my hair when that happens.

(Also, according to my curly-hair specializing stylist, it helps a lot if you comb it after you apply the conditioner and before you rinse. Less breakages that way, I guess.)

mzchristie:

micdotcom:

23 women show us their favorite positions

When reality television star and fashion blogger Lauren Conrad was asked what her “favorite position” was on a live radio program a while back, the women listening held their breath. Although we take great pride in the work that we do, most of us could relate to being undermined and belittled publicly at work. When Conrad cleverly retorted “CEO,” it was hard not to aggressively high-five our laptop and mobile devices. The words “hell” and “yeah” could be heard all across the nation.

1 in 3 women has experienced some form of sex discrimination at work | Follow micdotcom 

Exactly

(via elloellenoh)

iwgregorio:

Great interview with leeandlow on Southern California Public Radio on where to find diverse summer reading lists! 

iwgregorio:

Great interview with leeandlow on Southern California Public Radio on where to find diverse summer reading lists! 

(via weneeddiversebooks)

Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.

Cicero, 106 BC - 43 BC (via lazyyogi)

Uh. This guy is SOME KIND OF SORCERER.

(via delilahsdawson)

(via delilahsdawson)

sassykardashian:

my heart says yes but my bank balance says no

(via renardcapricieux)

fastcompany:

Kids Need A Flashlight To Read This Adorable Pop-up Book

Motion Silhouette tells a story through its shadows.

Reading by flashlight when you’re supposed to be asleep is practically a rite of passage for kids. An adorable new children’s book celebrates that tradition.

Read More>

(via bethrevis)

I guess
I disagree with you but ill let you have this one because I don’t feel like debating anymore with your simple ass (via monitormylife)

See also: “Fair enough”

(via booksandglobes)

starberry-cupcake:

Despite the surge in female protagonists in film and TV, the truth is women made up only 16% of employees on the top 250 films in 2013. Despite the depressing numbers, women are still making their mark. 

Carrie Tupper wrote a fantastic two-part article on The Mary Sue called The History of Women in Animation (which you can read here and here) and I illustrated here some of the amazing ladies mentioned there. 

(via ramentic)